Lunatic – From Latin, meaning ‘moon struck’

Lunatic is actually from the Latin ‘lunaticus’, with ‘luna’ meaning ‘moon’ and ‘ticus’ meaning ‘struck’, giving us ‘moon-struck’. Referring to perceived periodic changes of mental stability of the mentally ill, in line with the phases of the moon. The word travelled through 13th century French as ‘lunatique’ to become ‘lunatic’ today.

Corridor: From Latin: ‘To run’

The word comes from the Latin ‘currere’ which meant to run. This in itself was from the Proto-Indo-European (common ancestor of Indian and European language) ‘kers’; the Proto-Indo-Europeans had a much smaller vocabulary than modern languages, words were used to describe essential functions of human survival such as running. ‘Kers’ became ‘khouros’ in Greek and…

Devil incarnate – Devil made flesh

Phrase; ‘Devil incarnate’, it’s a saying that most of us have heard but what on earth does it mean to be ‘incarnate’? The definition is ‘to be in human form’ which stacks up, but where did the phrase come from? Like a whole host of sayings we have today, it’s a phrase which was created…

Muscle: Latin for ‘little mouse’

Muscle: Is actually a word we’ve borrowed from the French, which has its roots in the Latin word ‘musculus’, ‘mus’ referred to a mouse and ‘sculus’ meant little. So the word literally meant ‘little mouse’; the Romans felt that the movement of muscles resembled the movements of little mice under the skin. This is idea…