Corridor: From Latin: ‘To run’

The word comes from the Latin ‘currere’ which meant to run. This in itself was from the Proto-Indo-European (common ancestor of Indian and European language) ‘kers’; the Proto-Indo-Europeans had a much smaller vocabulary than modern languages, words were used to describe essential functions of human survival such as running. ‘Kers’ became ‘khouros’ in Greek and…

Thoughtful – To be filled with memories

Thoughtful – has two meanings, one is showing care and consideration of others, the other is to be absorbed in thought. Its first use in relation to the care of others is the most recent and is really a drilling down of the wider meaning, originally to be absorbed in thoughts of others, its first known usage…

Ketchup: Chinese fish sauce

Ketchup has a fairly recent etymology but has still come a long way in that short time. The word comes from a 17th century Chinese term ‘kê-chiap’ meaning ‘Brine’ and referred to a sauce made from pickled fish and spices. 18th century British explorers visiting the region brought the term (and the sauce) to England…

Muscle: Latin for ‘little mouse’

Muscle: Is actually a word we’ve borrowed from the French, which has its roots in the Latin word ‘musculus’, ‘mus’ refered to a mouse and ‘sculus’ meant little. So the word literally meant ‘little mouse’; the Romans felt that the movement of muscles resembled the movements of little mice under the skin. This is idea…

Phrase: Hair Of The Dog

If you’re feeling a little delicate after a night of drinking last night, someone may have recommended that you try the ‘Hair of the dog’; more alcohol the day after heavy drinking – but why is it called that? The phrase is short for ‘Hair of the dog that bit me’; to find the origins of…