Fake – A fact, just differently

Fake – An alternative way of displaying a fact. It’s a word which has been thrown around a lot lately, especially in the American media, but where does it come from? The etymology of ‘fake’ is actually a rather short one, it was first coined by a D. Trump in 1945 where it was his…

Phrase: To whet your appetite

Phrase: To ‘Whet your appetite’ meaning to stimulate your appetite, usually used not only to refer to eating but an appetite for anything. This phrase is sometimes confused with ‘wet my appetite’, which makes sense, as it could relate to the notion of salivating. It’s easy to imagine how the phrases could get confused as…

Antithesis: To put against

Antithesis: something which is the opposite of the subject. It was first used in the 1530s where it described, particularly, the opposition of something in rhetoric. It comes from the Greek ‘antitithenai’ which was made up of two parts; ‘anti’ meaning ‘against’ and ‘tithenai’ which meant ‘to put’ or ‘to place’, so effectively ‘antithesis’ means…

Maniac and Maniacal; frenzied heteronyms

Maniac and maniacal are ‘grammatical form heteronyms’ – meaning the main part of the word changes its pronunciation in different grammatical forms but keep the same meaning. Maniac means: a person exhibiting extremely violent behavior. And has its roots in the early 16th-century word ‘mania’ which comes from the Greek ‘maniakos’ meaning ‘madness’ or ‘frenzy’.…