Ambivalence: German meaning ‘both strong’, Read more:

Ambivalence – We have the Swiss psychologist Eugen Bleule to thank for the word ambivalence. The word is a translation of the German word ‘Ambivalenz’, introduced by Bleule in 1910. He was combining two Latin words; ‘Ambi’ meaning ‘both’ and ‘valentia’ which meant ‘To be strong’. ‘Ambi’ comes from the Proto-Indo-European word ‘ambhi’ meaning all around. And ‘valentia’…

Sycophant: ‘To show a fig’, Read more:

Sycophant: Comes from the Latin word ‘sycophanta’, which meant something quite different from today, ‘slanderer’ (c 1500s). ‘Sycophanta’ has its roots in the Greek ‘sykophantes’ which comes from a combination of ‘skyon’ meaning ‘fig’, and ‘phainein’ meaning ‘to show’. ‘To show a fig’ was a vulgar gesture in Greek times made by pushing the thumb…

Amaze: Literally meaning ‘a laberynth’, Read more

Amaze: The etymology of the word is both obvious and surprising, it does in fact, mean ‘A maze’. It is derived from the Middle English (c. 1150 CE to c. 1470 CE) word ‘amased’. Which is in turn derived from the Old English (pre 1150 CE) word ‘amasod’. Both words meaning, as amazed does today,…